Game Play Guidelines and Suggestions

The following is a list of game play guidelines and suggestions we feel helps you get the most out of your creative fiction and gaming experience. Please follow them as often as possible.

Play nice, play dirty – but make sure you play. When you commit to a collaborative game, you’ve made an unspoken promise to other players and Storytellers about your participation.

Storytellers are here to guide and interact. They are not here to tell you what to do, solve your character’s problems, lead your characters, or hand out all sorts of information in game. That said, pay attention to subtle clues, hooks, hints and tip-offs you might receive in game.

Characters who wait on Storytellers to hand them answers so they won’t have to solve the problem are going to wait a very long time. A very long time indeed.

It is your job as a player to PLAY. Be active, proactive and reactive – DO something. Explore settings. Ask questions and seek out answers. Think outside the box, even if the ideas seem not-entirely logical. Even misguided creativity is rewarding.

Be prepared for red herrings, straw men, obstacles, roadblocks, distractions, and dead ends.

Don’t be afraid of challenging Storytellers. Surprise us. We’re glad to see our nefarious schemes spoiled and players giving back the same level of challenge that we dish up.

If you find yourself feeling bored and uninvolved, don’t wait for others to initiate action. Be proactive about initiating situations and scenes.

Likewise, if you find yourself becoming bored with a scene and it begins to drag, wrap it and move on to initiate a new scene.

Don’t be afraid to let your character get hurt, and don’t let your fears get in the way of the story.

Be realistic. The game takes place in an imaginary world with imaginary people, but it still has to make sense.

Use speech, action and thoughts in good measure. They are highly important to character insight and give other players material to respond to.

Place your character in locations that makes him or her readily available for interaction.

Form bonds and relationships with other characters, but be realistic. No one falls in love at first sight or propose after two days.